Community tells Wright Museum Board “We are tired of the slave narrative”

Community tells Wright Museum Board “We are tired of the slave narrative”

by Tim Moore/UIN   The Board of the Charles Wright Museum of African American History held their annual community meeting on Thursday, Dec. 6, 2018. This was an opportunity to list their accomplishments for the year and layout what is planned for the coming year. They also discussed the financial standing, their search for a new president, and answered questions about an upcoming exhibit. There were passionate, yet cordial, discussions about a proposed Thomas Jefferson exhibit, the direction of the museum, and the makeup of the Board of Directors. The museum board seems to be composed of about 20 people, all with extensive corporate backgrounds. One of the criteria for membership to the board was being able to make a $10,000.00 payment/donation to the museum. It was not clear if all of the people had made that payment. David Rambau, a writer TV producer and community activist, made an observation that was serious food for thought. Of the museum’s $6.9m budget, they receive about $2 million from the city and another $200,000 from memberships. This totaled about a third of their operating budget, if each of the board members paid their $10k. Mr. Rambau rationalized that if this is the case, there should be more representation on the Board from the community who, as taxpayers, contribute to the $2m plus the MAAH spends during the year. The Board makeup was one of the primary concerns of the community groups. This is important because they determine the direction of the institution, and the types of exhibits offered. The proposed Jefferson Story is clearly one with opposing views. The Board apparently...
Black guys don’t get to be “Good guys with guns”

Black guys don’t get to be “Good guys with guns”

Written By David Dennis Posted November 26, 2018 Emantic “EJ” Fitzgerald Bradford, Jr. is a hero. Jemel Roberson is a hero. Bradford Jr., an active duty serviceman, was gunned down by police while trying to save lives endangered by a gunman at an Alabama mall on Thanksgiving night. Roberson was gunned down by police while apprehending a man who fired shots into a Chicago nightclub. He was wearing a uniform with the words “SECURITY” emblazoned on the front. In any scenario, two legally armed men being killed by cops while trying to save civilian lives would be a rallying cry for the NRA. But it isn’t. And you know why: Bradford Jr. and Roberson are Black. And the rhetoric that galvanizes groups like the NRA doesn’t apply to Black people. In theory, using that logic, the NRA should be outraged by the deaths of two legally armed men fulfilling their civic responsibilities as gun owners in accordance with NRA beliefs. But the NRA isn’t really about gun rights for the sake of gun rights. The NRA is about gun rights as medicine for the disease of non-whiteness. The NRA doesn’t want all people to have guns; the NRA wants white people to have guns to use against non-white people. The only time the NRA invokes Blackness is to threaten Black activists or use “grieving black mothers” as a means to misdirect legitimate criticisms of its policies. In order to believe that Bradford Jr. and Roberson were good guys with guns, one has to believe that they are first good guys. But that goes against what the NRA stands for...
New research show Africans interbred with Neanderthals more often than thought

New research show Africans interbred with Neanderthals more often than thought

by  Lorenzo Tanos   New research suggests that interbreeding between early humans and Neanderthals was not the rarity scientists had once thought it was, but rather a more regular occurrence over several thousands of years. In a study published Thursday in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, a pair of researchers from Temple University explained how the interbreeding started about 75,000 years ago — not long after early humans moved out of Africa and into Europe and certain parts of Asia. There, the early humans first encountered Neanderthals. As noted by History, earlier studies had suggested that most modern humans have about 2 percent Neanderthal DNA as a result of interbreeding between the two species. While a number of papers had suggested in recent years that modern humans, with the exception of those whose ancestors never left Africa, got their Neanderthal DNA from occasional encounters with the extinct hominid species, the researchers behind the new study stated otherwise. Said research team suggested that the early humans who populated Eurasia after leaving Africa interbred with Neanderthals at “multiple points in time” over a span of 35,000 years.to read more of this article click...
Stacey Abrams is no Al (“I give up”) Gore

Stacey Abrams is no Al (“I give up”) Gore

Kimberly Foster,HuffPost Opinion Mon, Nov 12 2:44 PM EST When I went to bed on the night of the 2018 midterm elections, I was heartbroken. Yes, the Democrats had taken back the House of Representatives, but the candidates I had been most invested in ― Stacey Abrams, Andrew Gillum and Beto O’Rourke ― had lost. I knew O’Rourke, despite his magnetism, probably wouldn’t get it done. My hopes were much higher for Abrams and Gillum. The polls conducted on their races showed these exceptional Black candidates tied or ahead leading into Election Day, a seeming miracle to me as a daughter of the South. I knew, though, that Abrams and Gillum were up against tremendous structural obstacles. Obstacles that political wit and charisma might not help them get over. Abrams’ contest against Brian Kemp, who as Georgia’s then-secretary of state would oversee his own election, was especially troublesome. In August, Abrams called Kemp “a remarkable architect of voter suppression” because of his department’s history of removing Georgians from voter rolls, rejecting high numbers of registrations and closing or moving voting sites. By Tuesday night’s end, neither Abrams or Gillum had the votes to claim victory. Gillum conceded by urging his supporters to continue fighting for their seat at the table. Abrams, however, refused to give in.  to read more of this story, click here: ...
Is Detroit the next Atlanta?

Is Detroit the next Atlanta?

A recent analysis by Bloomberg ranked large cities with at least 250,000 residents according to the distribution of household income among individuals to see which has the worst income inequality. From being number two in three consecutive years, Atlanta took the top spot this year, surpassing the two-year number one Miami. Atlanta, one of the largest metropolitan areas in the country, is a home to many Fortune 500 companies such as Coca-Cola and Delta. Despite that, the income gap has been widened by the number of low-wage retail and hospitality jobs. About one out of four of its residents are low-income, the U.S. Census Bureau reports. Moreover, affordable housing seems to be lacking in the area as luxury apartment buildings with expensive rents replaced what used to be Black neighborhoods. About 22% of renters in Atlanta proper’s Fulton County received eviction notices in 2015, resulting in a “crisis” as the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta calls it. The income gap is very well seen between whites and Blacks. While white residents of Atlanta make $80,000 yearly, Blacks in the city only make $30,000. Even worse, 80% of African-American children in Atlanta live in high-poverty neighborhoods compared to only 6% in their white peers. Because of the lack of affordable housing, wage inequity, and poverty rates, there were higher crime rates, lower educational outcomes, and Black residents were forced to leave. As a matter of fact, the city’s Black population dropped from 61 percent to 53 percent, while White residents in the city rose from 33 percent to 40 percent from 2000 to 2015. Atlanta’s new Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms is trying...
Defending Kanye West

Defending Kanye West

By Richard B. Muhammad -Final Call   Black Twitter was ablaze and much of Black America was enraged after a meeting between Kanye West and President Donald Trump in the Oval Office with critics blasting Yeezy as everything from a victim of bi-polar disease to a sell-out. But there is more to the Oct. 10 encounter between a president largely reviled by Blacks and the outspoken rapper who said on live tv, “George Bush doesn’t care about Black people,” over the disastrous federal failure in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina. The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan touched on one of these points Oct. 14 during a major address in Detroit to mark the 23rd anniversary of the Million Man March and Holy Day of Atonement. “Let me talk about Kanye. I’m not one of these beat-a-man-down kinds of guy. I happen to love Kanye,” said Min. Farrakhan. “Kanye talked about the 13th Amendment and he was telling Mr. Trump that you don’t build something that is supposed to be firm and have a trap door in it unless you’re building a trap door for somebody that you want to trap. I’m going to help Kanye out with this…..to read more of this article, click...