Colorado residents vote in favor of city run broadband

Colorado residents vote in favor of city run broadband

Mallory Locklear,Engadget Thu, Nov 9 11:28 PM EST Internet access and quality varies widely depending on where you live in the US. There’s a huge rural broadband gap that the FCC, companies like Microsoft and the Trump administration have said they’d like to close in the coming years and as Cleveland’s situation shows, service can be drastically different even within the same city. One solution that has been proposed as a fix for spotty or inadequate broadband service is city-run internet, and it’s one that Colorado communities are continuing to back. Colorado state law requires municipalities to hold public referendums before they can provide services like broadband internet access. And as of Tuesday’s elections, Ars Technica reports, 31 of the state’s 64 counties have opted to allow their local governments to build broadband networks. Voters in Fort Collins, Colorado joined those supporting municipal broadband, approving a ballot measure giving its city council permission to establish a city-run network. The measure passed despite an anti-municipal broadband group that spent nearly half of a million dollars campaigning against it. The group was funded by the Colorado Cable Telecommunications Association and the city’s chamber of commerce, which Comcast and CenturyLink are members of. And though it doesn’t mean each of them will actually build their own broadband networks, over 100 cities, towns and counties in Colorado have now passed ballot measures allowing their towns to do so, Motherboard reports. Other states have been even more aggressive in their attempts to restrict municipal broadband. Earlier this year, a Virginia politician proposed a bill that would make municipal internet nearly impossible to establish throughout...
Confessions of a liberal White racist

Confessions of a liberal White racist

reprinted for Yahoo I am the co-owner of a successful business with clients across the U.S. and in 27 countries. We have a racially diverse staff of 22. Over the years I have supported efforts to improve the conditions of “underserved” blacks. And I think it’s fair to say that, while I see the color of a person’s skin, I am able to get beyond it. I am a white man but I attended an integrated junior high school, dated across the race line, and two of my four adopted children are black. There is a good chance my two beautiful daughters will one day bless me with black grandchildren. And I am racist. Racism, I recently came to understand, isn’t about me having some kind of hate in my heart for black people in general, nor is it about me believing that the failures of individual black people in our society are because they are morally or intellectually inferior. Racism is more than individual beliefs and actions. It is a complex system that has given — and continues to give — my racial group a host of advantages and power by oppressing and disadvantaging others. Understanding and confronting that system begins with a history lesson and some simple math. I received that history lesson over the course of a two-day workshop in New Orleans that I attended to better understand disparities. My company’s clients, public sector and nonprofit agencies, have increasingly put disparities at the center of any serious efforts to improve outcomes for children and families. And, perhaps because of the recent presidential election, we are seeing both an increasing sense of urgency and greater willingness to...
Black owned media suffering slow death

Black owned media suffering slow death

(note: this is an excerpt from a 2012 article in The Final Call)                                                                            (note i: logos shown are formally Black owned media that are out of business or now owned by the Hispanic conglomerate Univision or other non Black companies despite whose face they put out front.) CHICAGO (FinalCall.com) – Living in dangerous times is how Sherman Kizart of Kizart Media Partners described the current state of Black-owned media companies during a panel discussion, “Telecom: Minority Media Ownership: Can We keep Hope Alive?” at the 41st Annual Conference of the Rainbow PUSH Coalition and Citizenship Education Fund. Blacks own less than one percent of full power commercial television stations and less than three percent of commercial radio stations, yet make up nearly 14 percent of the total U.S. population. Multi-media consolidation by huge corporate conglomerates, lack of access to capital and advertisers that do not target Black and minority stations are a few challenges making it tough to get a foothold in ownership. Mr. Kizart related the fate of Inner City Broadcasting, a New York-based company founded in the early 1970s that recently shut its doors. At one time, it was the largest Black owner of radio stations nationwide, co-founded by the late Percy Sutton. The company was a founding member of the National Association of Black Owned Broadcasters, which advocates for Black media ownership in television and radio. “As of July 12...
Dr. Martin Luther King took a knee also

Dr. Martin Luther King took a knee also

by Paul Lee 9 24 17 On Feb. 1, 1965, a cold, rainy day, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (left), Dr. Ralph David Abernathy (center) and nearly 800 hundred other “black” and “white” nonviolent freedom fighters took a knee against voting-rights restrictions, racist violence and poverty at Selma, Ala., then one of the bastions of southern “racial” segregation. Shortly after praying, mass arrests were made, but Dr. King and Dr. Abernathy refused to post bail as a witness against these injustices.   It was Dr. King’s first arrest since he received the Nobel Peace Prize the previous December. “If Negroes could vote,” Dr. King declared in a speech at Selma’s historic Brown Chapel African Methodist Episcopal (AME) church before the march, “there would be no Jim Clarks [the sheriff responsible for most of the racist violence], there would be no oppressive poverty directed against Negroes, our children would not be crippled by segregated schools, and the whole community might live together in harmony” (The New York Times, 2/2/65, p. 1). DELIBERATE, PLANNED PROTEST “I must confess this is a deliberate attempt to dramatize conditions in this city,” Dr. King told reporters (The Washington Post, 2/2/65, p. A1).   However, the march was not spontaneous nor were the arrests unexpected.   Indeed, Dr. King was carrying a washcloth and a toothbrush when he was arrested and he and Dr. Abernathy were allowed bags of cookies and peanuts in jail (Newsday [Long Island, N.Y.], 2/3/65, p. 1; Chicago Tribune, 2/1/65, p. 1). As an unpublished six-page “master plan” by Dr. King’s Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) explained:   “After Dr. King is in jail, a letter dealing with...
Revered actor and football star Bernie Casey dead at 78

Revered actor and football star Bernie Casey dead at 78

His film résumé includes ‘Boxcar Bertha,’ ‘Never Say Never Again,’ ‘Brothers,’ ‘Revenge of the Nerds’ and ‘Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure.’ Actor Bernie Casey, who appeared in such films as Boxcar Bertha, Never Say Never Again and Revenge of the Nerds after a career as a standout NFL wide receiver, has died. He was 78. Casey, who also starred in Cleopatra Jones and several other blaxploitation movies of the 1970s, died Tuesday after a brief illness at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, his representative told The Hollywood Reporter. In the Warner Bros. drama Brothers (1977), Casey distinguished himself by portraying a thinly veiled version of George Jackson, a member of the Black Panther Party who was killed in what officials described as an escape attempt from San Quentin in 1971. His writings had inspired oppressed people around the world, and Bob Dylan recorded a song as a tribute to Jackson in 1971. Casey also wrote, directed, starred in and produced The Dinner (1997), centering on three black men who discuss slavery, black self-loathing, homophobia, etc. while sitting around the dinner table. Casey played a heroic former slave and train robber in Martin Scorsese’s Boxcar Bertha (1972), was CIA agent Felix Leiter (a recurring character in Bond films) in Never Say Never Again (1983) and portrayed U.N. Jefferson, the president of the Lambda Lambda Lambda fraternity, in Revenge of the Nerds (1984) and two follow-up telefilms. In Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure (1989), Casey played schoolteacher Mr. Ryan (“Who was Joan of Arc?” he asks, and Keanu Reeves’ Ted guesses, “Noah’s wife?”), portrayed a detective opposite Burt Reynolds in Sharky’s Machine (1981)...
American women will continue to dominate tennis with US Open win by Sloane Stevens

American women will continue to dominate tennis with US Open win by Sloane Stevens

On Saturday, Sloane Stephens made history, jumping more than 900 spots as the second unseeded woman ever to win a Grand Slam at the US Open and the first unranked female to win her maiden title. The 24-year-old, back this summer from almost a year off the courts because of a foot injury, played a near-perfect game with a 6-3 6-0 victory against 15th-seeded Madison Keys, who was playing with a heavily bandaged right thigh. ‘It’s incredible. I honestly had surgery January 23 and if someone had told me I’d win the US Open, I would have said it’s impossible,’ said Stephens, who will pocket a record $3.7million check. In the first all-American US Open women’s final since Serena Williams beat her sister Venus in 2002, Stephens made only six unforced errors to frustrate Keys. But not many know much about how the rising star, who was down to 957th in the world at the start of August. And with experts saying she could be the next Serena, we let you get to know the newest champion. Sloane Stephens, 24, made history jumping more than 900 spots as the second unseeded woman ever to win a Grand Slam at the US Open and the first unranked female to win her maiden title (pictured, with her trophy) Stephens (left), back this summer from almost a year off the courts because of a foot injury, played a near-perfect game with a 6-3 6-0 victory against 15th-seeded Madison Keys (right), who was playing with a heavily bandaged right thigh.   Stephens (left and right) is taking home a record $3.7million check as a...
Facebook caught yet again lying about it’s numbers

Facebook caught yet again lying about it’s numbers

Senior analyst at Pivotal Research, Brian Wieser, has issued a report pointing out that Facebook has been claiming to reach more people than U.S. Census data says exist. Facebook has been promoting itself as reaching 41 million adults between the ages of 18 and 24. However, Census data says there are just 31 million. And Facebook also says it reaches 60 million people between the ages of 25 and 34, while the U.S. Census estimates that total to be 35 million. Wieser says he began his own inquiry into the data situation after Australia’s AdNews found discrepancies between Facebook claims and Census data in that country. A Facebook spokesperson says the estimates the platform uses “are not designed to match population or census estimates.” Instead they are “designed to estimate how many people in a given area are eligible to see an ad a business might run.” WHY THIS MATTERS: However it tries to justify use of the faulty numbers, Facebook will not ingratiate itself to advertisers for offering up misleading data. Wieser told The New York Times, “The buyers and marketers I talked to were unaware of this and they are using [the Facebook data] for planning purposes. Buyers are still going to buy from them and plan for them, but this is something that doesn’t need to be an error and puts every other metric they might provide into...
Taking children and how the system “profits off of pain”

Taking children and how the system “profits off of pain”

Foster Care as Punishment: The New Reality of ‘Jane Crow’ Maisha Joefield briefly lost custody of a child who wandered away while she was taking a bath. By STEPHANIE CLIFFORD and JESSICA SILVER-GREENBERG JULY 21, 2017- nytimes.com Maisha Joefield thought she was getting by pretty well as a young single mother in Brooklyn, splurging on her daughter, Deja, even though money was tight. When Deja was a baby, she bought her Luvs instead of generic diapers when she could. When her daughter got a little older, Ms. Joefield outfitted the bedroom in their apartment with a princess bed for Deja, while she slept on a pullout couch. She had family around, too. Though she had broken up with Deja’s father, they spent holidays and vacations together for Deja’s sake. Ms. Joefield’s grandmother lived across the street, and Deja knew she could always go to her great-grandmother’s apartment in an emergency. One night, exhausted, Ms. Joefield put Deja to bed, and plopped into a bath with her headphones on. “By the time I come out, I’m looking, I don’t see my child,” said Ms. Joefield, who began frantically searching the building. Deja, who was 5, had indeed headed for the grandmother’s house when she couldn’t find her mother, but the next thing Ms. Joefield knew, it was a police matter. “I’m thinking, I’ll explain to them what happened, and I’ll get my child,” Ms. Joefield said. For most parents, this scenario might be a panic-inducing, but hardly insurmountable, hiccup in the long trial of raising a child. Yet for Ms. Joefield and women in her circumstances — living in poor...
NAACP issues Travel Advisory for African Americans thinking about going to Missouri

NAACP issues Travel Advisory for African Americans thinking about going to Missouri

NAACP Warns Minorities, Women Heading To Missouri: ‘They May Not Be Safe’ Taryn Finley,HuffPost 8 hours ago NAACP delegates have approved a travel advisory warning marginalized groups that “they may not be safe” if they go to Missouri because their civil rights are likely to be violated. The delegates voted Wednesday to nationally adopt the advisory, which was put in place statewide in June, according to the Springfield News-Leader. The advisory ― directed at people of color, women, people who identify as LGBTQ and those with disabilities ― cites recent legislation signed by Gov. Eric Greitens (R) that makes it even more difficult to sue for housing or employment discrimination. NAACP Springfield chapter President Cheryl Clay and other chapter members emphasized that this is not a boycott, but a warning and a response to the legislation. “Our ongoing issues of racial profiling, discrimination, harassment and excess violence towards people of color have been further exacerbated by the passage and signing of [Senate Bill] 43,” Clay said in a statement to the News-Leader. “Not all the communities have the desire or the will to do the right thing for people in their community,” Clay added. “Thus, this is why Missouri has earned the travel advisory for the whole state.” In addition to the bill, the advisory condemns the state for a number of issues dating back to the Missouri Compromise of 1819. Those include “racial and ethnic disparities in education, health, economic empowerment and criminal justice,” a “long history” of racial violence and harassment, and recent data that shows black drivers were 75 percent more likely to be pulled over by cops than...
UIN launches android 4K Smart Box streaming device

UIN launches android 4K Smart Box streaming device

UIN has launched its feature rich android streaming TV device called the UIN Smart Box *African American owned and operated UIN (Urban Information Network) was among a hand full of high tech companies that recently met with FCC Chairman Ajit Pai in Detroit in March. After getting clarity on various issues and regulations, UIN has launched its feature rich android streaming TV device called the UIN Smart Box. It gives customers more control and more choices of what they can watch on TV. It also saves users a tremendous amount of money by reducing or eliminating their cable bill, and allowing consumers the ability to buy and own their box rather than pay every month for life with the cable companies. While current streaming devices like Amazon Firestick, Roku, and Google Chromecast offer standard apps, the UIN Smart Box offers the standard apps plus a unique pre-installed app of value that includes churches, radio networks and cultural institutions particular to local cities. As of now, the UIN Smart Box is the only streaming device that offers this!   As UIN grows and expands, they plan to train and pay good wages for young people from each community to program, install and maintain the boxes. With this high-tech cutting-edge product, UIN, America’s oldest operating Internet TV network is poised to emerge as a major player in the new and growing industry . The UIN Subscription service offer programming on news , entertainment and culture… and Black history that you will find nowhere else! To watch a short video about the UIN Smart Box, visit: https://s3.amazonaws.com/uin-advertisments/box-ad-aaa.mp4 To place an order for...