Why Hillary lost

Why Hillary lost

by Tim Moore Why Hillary lost      We in the media are in a privileged position.  We get special invitation from entities to their meetings. We get to cover important events, they put us upfront and in some cases, they even feed us. To top it off, we get in free.       The reason for this treatment is that we broadcast their messages or in some cases their propaganda. In providing this serviced to the public, we get to hear more of what is going on with issues that people should care about. So, when you couple this access with interview we do with people in the know, we have an accurate pulse of the citizens we cater to. So, we  know more about the issues that matter to the urban community. It just makes sense.       Now, what does all this have to do with the election? Well, we at UIN covered the Democratic Convention in Philadelphia, and we covered Hillary’s rallies and 2 Trump appearances in Detroit. What we found was that the Trump supporters were far, far more enthusiastic about their candidate than the Democrats we spoke to were for Hilary. While they said they would vote for Hillary, I could see no excitement when they mentioned her name. From this polling, I have been telling people that if it rains on election day, Hillary, will lose. It rained on election day in Detroit. People who watch Detroit IPTV were not surprised by the outcome because we talk to the experts and the community. Our viewers know what is going on.     When all the votes...
Facebook caught cheating again

Facebook caught cheating again

Facebook Sued Over Inflated Video Ad Metrics by Wendy Davis@wendyndavis, Three marketers who say they purchased video ads on Facebook have sued the social networking service for allegedly providing incorrect metrics about the length of time that users spent watching video ads. The marketers allege in a potential class-action that Facebook “induced” advertisers to purchase video ads — and to pay higher rates for them — by overstating the time that people spent watching video ads. The complaint stems from recent revelations that Facebook inflated the average time spent viewing ad clips by 60% to 80%. Facebook said in September that its mistaken calculations didn’t affect billing. But the marketers contend that the incorrect metrics made video ads appear more valuable than was the case. “By misrepresenting the average time its millions of consumers spent watching posted advertising videos, Facebook induced advertisers, like Plaintiffs, to continue to purchase video advertisements based on the belief that the advertisements were more successful than they actually were,” marketers Tom Letizia, Mark Fierro and Greg Agustin allege in a class-action complaint filed late last week in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California. The complaint alleges that Facebook violated various California laws, including laws regarding unfair and fraudulent business conduct. “As a result of Facebook’s ‘unfair’ conduct, plaintiffs and members of the class expended money on advertising that they would not otherwise have spent, or overspent for advertising on the Website based upon Facebook’s representations that their video advertisements were being viewed at much longer durations than the time actually viewed,” the marketers allege. They are seeking monetary damages and attorney’s...
United Nation say US owe African American Reparation for slavery and terrorism

United Nation say US owe African American Reparation for slavery and terrorism

The history of slavery in the United States justifies reparations for African Americans, argues a recent report by a U.N.-affiliated group based in Geneva. This conclusion was part of a study by the United Nations’ Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent, a body that reports to the international organization’s High Commissioner on Human Rights. The group of experts, which includes leading human rights lawyers from around the world, presented its findings to the United Nations Human Rights Council on Monday, pointing to the continuing link between present injustices and the dark chapters of American history. “In particular, the legacy of colonial history, enslavement, racial subordination and segregation, racial terrorism and racial inequality in the United States remains a serious challenge, as there has been no real commitment to reparations and to truth and reconciliation for people of African descent,” the report stated. “Contemporary police killings and the trauma that they create are reminiscent of the pastracial terror of lynching.” Citing the past year’s spate of police officers killing unarmed African American men, the panel warned against “impunity for state violence,” which has created, in its words, a “human rights crisis” that “must be addressed as a matter of urgency.” The panel drew its recommendations, which are nonbinding and unlikely to influence Washington, after a fact-finding mission in the United States in January. At the time, it hailed the strides taken to make the American criminal justice system more equitable but pointed to the corrosive legacy of the past. “Despite substantial changes since the end of the enforcement of Jim Crow and the fight for civil rights, ideology ensuring the domination of one...
2016; year of the African American Woman

2016; year of the African American Woman

by Timothy Moore/UIN As Serena edges closer to being named the greatest female athlete ever, it is clear that there are a larger than normal number of African American women doing some exceptional things in 2016. I will get to the others, but Serena is deserving of all the accolades that are finally coming her way. She has won more major tennis championships than most countries. Think about that for a minute. She was born with gifts but she maximized that with years and years of hard work.  A testimony to her popularity is her 6 million twitter followers. I am sure many men tune in into her matches just to watch her sculptured physique chase down tennis balls (smile). Although she may be the greatest tennis player, she is not invincible. She lost the in the first round at the Rio Olympics this year. Serena lost, but many African American women won big time at the Olympics. They made a major contributions to the medal count for the United States. What was impressive is the fact that they won Gold Medals in areas that were once thought to be outside the realm of high performance of African Americans. The events included Fencing, Swimming, and the Shot Put. They have changed the face of gymnastics with Simone building on what Gabby did four years ago. Their supreme grace and beauty is undeniable. My favorite of course, were the ladies of Track and Field. From the powerful young lady with the gentle voice who won the Shot Put, to the captivating Hurdlers and Sprinters. They are collegiate and well spoken,...
Set-top-box issue, so you won’t be the last to know

Set-top-box issue, so you won’t be the last to know

Tom Wheeler, Chairman/FCC There’s never been a better time to watch television in America. We have more options than ever, and, with so much competition for eyeballs, studios and artists keep raising the bar for quality content. But when it comes to the set-top-box that delivers our pay-TV subscriptions, we have essentially no options, creating headaches and costing us serious money in rental fees. That makes no sense, which is why I’m sharing a proposal with my fellow commissioners at the Federal Communications Commission to change the system. Ninety-nine percent of pay-TV subscribers currently lease set-top boxes from their cable, satellite or telecommunications provider, paying an average of $231 a year for the privilege, according to a recent analysis. The collective tab is $20 billion annually in rental fees. In a recent study, 84% of consumers felt their cable bill was too high. What they may not realize is that every bill includes an add-on fee for their set-top boxes. We keep paying these charges even after the cost of the box has been recovered because we have no meaningful alternative. Pay-TV providers will be required to provide apps — free of charge — that consumers can download to the device of their choosing. Earlier this year, the FCC launched a process to unlock the set-top-box marketplace. We were motivated by the desire to give consumers relief, but we were also mandated to take action by Congress and the law, which says that consumers should be able to choose their preferred device to access pay-TV programming. Over the past seven months, the Commission conducted an open proceeding where we...
Jack Daniels Whiskey empire build on knowledge from slaves

Jack Daniels Whiskey empire build on knowledge from slaves

By CLAY RISENJUNE 25, 2016   LYNCHBURG, Tenn. — Every year, about 275,000 people tour the Jack Daniel’s distillery here, and as they stroll through its brick buildings nestled in a tree-shaded hollow, they hear a story like this: Sometime in the 1850s, when Daniel was a boy, he went to work for a preacher, grocer and distiller named Dan Call. The preacher was a busy man, and when he saw promise in young Jack, he taught him how to run his whiskey still — and the rest is history. This year is the 150th anniversary of Jack Daniel’s, and the distillery, home to one of the world’s best-selling whiskeys, is using the occasion to tell a different, more complicated tale. Daniel, the company now says, didn’t learn distilling from Dan Call, but from a man named Nearis Green — one of Call’s slaves. This version of the story was never a secret, but it is one that the distillery has only recently begun to embrace, tentatively, in some of its tours, and in a social media and marketing campaign this summer. “It’s taken something like the anniversary for us to start to talk about ourselves,” said Nelson Eddy, Jack Daniel’s in-house historian. Frontier history is a gauzy and unreliable pursuit, and Nearis Green’s story — built on oral history and the thinnest of archival trails — may never be definitively proved. Still, the decision to tell it resonates far beyond this small city. For years, the prevailing history of American whiskey has been framed as a lily-white affair, centered on German and Scots-Irish settlers who distilled their surplus...
George Curry, noted journalist and publisher joins the ancestors

George Curry, noted journalist and publisher joins the ancestors

George Curry, the legendary columnist, commentator and champion of black journalists, died of sudden heart failure on Saturday. He was 69. Curry grew up in Tuscaloosa, Ala., where he was childhood friends with Bernard Lafayette, the current chairman of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. “This is a tragic loss to the movement because George Curry was a journalist who paid special attention to civil rights because he lived it and loved it,” Lafayette told Trice Edney News Wire. Curry began his career as reporter for Sports Illustrated and The St. Louis Dispatch. In the 1990s, he was the editor of Emerge, an edgy political and cultural publication with the tag line “Black America’s Newsmagazine.” In 1993, the cover depicted Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas wearing an Aunt Jemima-style handkerchief next to the word “BETRAYED.” Curry was the first African-American to be elected president of the American Society of Magazine Editors. After Emerge folded in 2000, Curry led the news service for the National Newspaper Publishers Association for nine years. He wrote a syndicated column that was published in black newspapers all over the country, and he frequently appeared as a commentator on television and radio news programs. NPR’s Karen Grigsby Bates interviewed Curry on numerous occasions. In 2012, she spoke to him about how the media approached the murder of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teenager who was shot to death by a white man in Florida. Bates reported: “Syndicated columnist George Curry says the black media have a long history of highlighting anti-black violence, which mainstream media often picks up on later. ” ‘The black press plays a...
DOJ to end use of private prisons. Prison stocks plummets

DOJ to end use of private prisons. Prison stocks plummets

The Justice Department will end its use of private prisons, officials said in a memo reported today by The Washington Post. The decision follows a major report released by the department’s inspector general last week that found that inmates in private prisons were more likely to be injured and that the prisons were less effective that publicly run institutions. “They simply do not provide the same level of correctional services, programs, and resources; they do not save substantially on costs; and as noted in a recent report by the Department’s Office of Inspector General, they do not maintain the same level of safety and security,” Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates wrote in the memo, the Post reported. The federal government currently contracts 13 private prisons, most of which hold undocumented immigrants who could face deportation. The changes will happen gradually, as Justice Department officials decide not to renew private prison contracts as they come due, Yates said. As of December 2015, there were more than 22,000 federal inmates in private prisons, the report found. Yates told the Post she hoped that by May 1, 2017, the total private prison population would stand at less than 14,200 inmates. State inmates in private prisons will not be directly affected by the new policy. It’s unclear whether the policy also applies to the immigration detention centers run by the Department of Homeland Security. The stock of the country’s two biggest private prison companies, Corrections Corporation of America and the GEO Group, immediately fell upon the release of the...
Trump’s reveals his version of Voo Doo economics in Detroit speech

Trump’s reveals his version of Voo Doo economics in Detroit speech

Trumponomics favors pin-stripes over blue collars By Gina Chon August 8, 2016 The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.  Donald Trump’s plan to make America great again favors pin-striped suits and Hermès ties over blue collars. The Republican presidential nominee laid out his plan to boost U.S. growth on Monday, calling for corporate tax cuts and a halt to new financial regulation. Billionaire investors and donors to the Trump campaign who comprise his newly announced economic team helped craft the proposal. The artifice was perpetuated by Trump’s decision to unveil his latest ideas in Detroit, a Rust Belt symbol of American labor only two years out of bankruptcy. And yet a blanket moratorium on any new federal rules would primarily benefit big businesses and Wall Street. Trump cited manufacturing industry research that “overregulation” costs the economy up to $2 trillion a year. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, bank lobbyists and others have sued President Barack Obama’s administration dozens of times over a variety of restrictions. Trump also wants to roll back environmental protections, including ones that reduce carbon-dioxide emissions. Much of Trump’s economic scheme seems to rely on trickle-down theories that have been debunked. As the ranks of the rich expanded under Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush, the middle class shrank. The International Monetary Fund said in a 2015 report that if the share of income among the top 20 percent increases, GDP growth actually declines because the benefits don’t reach the lower classes. It is telling that most of Trump’s advisers are wealthy businessmen. The economic team he announced last...
The Olympics give us another chance to enjoy Serena Williams’ greatness

The Olympics give us another chance to enjoy Serena Williams’ greatness

  By Rodger Sherman @rodger_sherman on Aug 1, 2016 Serena’s consistent ass-kicking in singles has recently been coupled with the resurgence of her brilliant doubles partnership with Venus. The two have spent most of their respectively brilliant careers partnering in doubles on the side, winning 13 Grand Slams together between 1999 and 2012. They even won three Olympic gold The Olympics are not our only opportunity to watch Serena Williams be great. Unlike America’s swimmers, sprinters, divers, fencers, volleyballers, judokas and shotputters, Williams gets to play in multiple tournaments on global broadcasts every year. But Rio certainly is another opportunity to watch Williams be great. And she’s so great, we really shouldn’t pass those chances up. As of right now, Williams is tied for the lead in two career-defining categories. Winning at Wimbledon brought her individual Grand Slam titles to 22, which ties her with Steffi Graf for the Open Era record. And she and her sister Venus have four Olympic medals each, all gold, which ties them with Reginald Doherty, a Brit who won three golds and a silver back in the 1900s. Venus and Serena both have good chances at earning medals in the doubles portion to bump them up to five, and Serena should medal in singles to get her up to six and make her the most decorated tennis Olympian of all time. Serena has been winning majors since 1999, longer than this year’s youngest Olympians have been alive. And she’s been No. 1 in the world rankings for 178 weeks. And yet it doesn’t get old. After 17 years, you’d think cracks would come...