Revered actor and football star Bernie Casey dead at 78

Revered actor and football star Bernie Casey dead at 78

His film résumé includes ‘Boxcar Bertha,’ ‘Never Say Never Again,’ ‘Brothers,’ ‘Revenge of the Nerds’ and ‘Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure.’ Actor Bernie Casey, who appeared in such films as Boxcar Bertha, Never Say Never Again and Revenge of the Nerds after a career as a standout NFL wide receiver, has died. He was 78. Casey, who also starred in Cleopatra Jones and several other blaxploitation movies of the 1970s, died Tuesday after a brief illness at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, his representative told The Hollywood Reporter. In the Warner Bros. drama Brothers (1977), Casey distinguished himself by portraying a thinly veiled version of George Jackson, a member of the Black Panther Party who was killed in what officials described as an escape attempt from San Quentin in 1971. His writings had inspired oppressed people around the world, and Bob Dylan recorded a song as a tribute to Jackson in 1971. Casey also wrote, directed, starred in and produced The Dinner (1997), centering on three black men who discuss slavery, black self-loathing, homophobia, etc. while sitting around the dinner table. Casey played a heroic former slave and train robber in Martin Scorsese’s Boxcar Bertha (1972), was CIA agent Felix Leiter (a recurring character in Bond films) in Never Say Never Again (1983) and portrayed U.N. Jefferson, the president of the Lambda Lambda Lambda fraternity, in Revenge of the Nerds (1984) and two follow-up telefilms. In Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure (1989), Casey played schoolteacher Mr. Ryan (“Who was Joan of Arc?” he asks, and Keanu Reeves’ Ted guesses, “Noah’s wife?”), portrayed a detective opposite Burt Reynolds in Sharky’s Machine (1981)...
American women will continue to dominate tennis with US Open win by Sloane Stevens

American women will continue to dominate tennis with US Open win by Sloane Stevens

On Saturday, Sloane Stephens made history, jumping more than 900 spots as the second unseeded woman ever to win a Grand Slam at the US Open and the first unranked female to win her maiden title. The 24-year-old, back this summer from almost a year off the courts because of a foot injury, played a near-perfect game with a 6-3 6-0 victory against 15th-seeded Madison Keys, who was playing with a heavily bandaged right thigh. ‘It’s incredible. I honestly had surgery January 23 and if someone had told me I’d win the US Open, I would have said it’s impossible,’ said Stephens, who will pocket a record $3.7million check. In the first all-American US Open women’s final since Serena Williams beat her sister Venus in 2002, Stephens made only six unforced errors to frustrate Keys. But not many know much about how the rising star, who was down to 957th in the world at the start of August. And with experts saying she could be the next Serena, we let you get to know the newest champion. Sloane Stephens, 24, made history jumping more than 900 spots as the second unseeded woman ever to win a Grand Slam at the US Open and the first unranked female to win her maiden title (pictured, with her trophy) Stephens (left), back this summer from almost a year off the courts because of a foot injury, played a near-perfect game with a 6-3 6-0 victory against 15th-seeded Madison Keys (right), who was playing with a heavily bandaged right thigh.   Stephens (left and right) is taking home a record $3.7million check as a...
Facebook caught yet again lying about it’s numbers

Facebook caught yet again lying about it’s numbers

Senior analyst at Pivotal Research, Brian Wieser, has issued a report pointing out that Facebook has been claiming to reach more people than U.S. Census data says exist. Facebook has been promoting itself as reaching 41 million adults between the ages of 18 and 24. However, Census data says there are just 31 million. And Facebook also says it reaches 60 million people between the ages of 25 and 34, while the U.S. Census estimates that total to be 35 million. Wieser says he began his own inquiry into the data situation after Australia’s AdNews found discrepancies between Facebook claims and Census data in that country. A Facebook spokesperson says the estimates the platform uses “are not designed to match population or census estimates.” Instead they are “designed to estimate how many people in a given area are eligible to see an ad a business might run.” WHY THIS MATTERS: However it tries to justify use of the faulty numbers, Facebook will not ingratiate itself to advertisers for offering up misleading data. Wieser told The New York Times, “The buyers and marketers I talked to were unaware of this and they are using [the Facebook data] for planning purposes. Buyers are still going to buy from them and plan for them, but this is something that doesn’t need to be an error and puts every other metric they might provide into...
Taking children and how the system “profits off of pain”

Taking children and how the system “profits off of pain”

Foster Care as Punishment: The New Reality of ‘Jane Crow’ Maisha Joefield briefly lost custody of a child who wandered away while she was taking a bath. By STEPHANIE CLIFFORD and JESSICA SILVER-GREENBERG JULY 21, 2017- nytimes.com Maisha Joefield thought she was getting by pretty well as a young single mother in Brooklyn, splurging on her daughter, Deja, even though money was tight. When Deja was a baby, she bought her Luvs instead of generic diapers when she could. When her daughter got a little older, Ms. Joefield outfitted the bedroom in their apartment with a princess bed for Deja, while she slept on a pullout couch. She had family around, too. Though she had broken up with Deja’s father, they spent holidays and vacations together for Deja’s sake. Ms. Joefield’s grandmother lived across the street, and Deja knew she could always go to her great-grandmother’s apartment in an emergency. One night, exhausted, Ms. Joefield put Deja to bed, and plopped into a bath with her headphones on. “By the time I come out, I’m looking, I don’t see my child,” said Ms. Joefield, who began frantically searching the building. Deja, who was 5, had indeed headed for the grandmother’s house when she couldn’t find her mother, but the next thing Ms. Joefield knew, it was a police matter. “I’m thinking, I’ll explain to them what happened, and I’ll get my child,” Ms. Joefield said. For most parents, this scenario might be a panic-inducing, but hardly insurmountable, hiccup in the long trial of raising a child. Yet for Ms. Joefield and women in her circumstances — living in poor...
NAACP issues Travel Advisory for African Americans thinking about going to Missouri

NAACP issues Travel Advisory for African Americans thinking about going to Missouri

NAACP Warns Minorities, Women Heading To Missouri: ‘They May Not Be Safe’ Taryn Finley,HuffPost 8 hours ago NAACP delegates have approved a travel advisory warning marginalized groups that “they may not be safe” if they go to Missouri because their civil rights are likely to be violated. The delegates voted Wednesday to nationally adopt the advisory, which was put in place statewide in June, according to the Springfield News-Leader. The advisory ― directed at people of color, women, people who identify as LGBTQ and those with disabilities ― cites recent legislation signed by Gov. Eric Greitens (R) that makes it even more difficult to sue for housing or employment discrimination. NAACP Springfield chapter President Cheryl Clay and other chapter members emphasized that this is not a boycott, but a warning and a response to the legislation. “Our ongoing issues of racial profiling, discrimination, harassment and excess violence towards people of color have been further exacerbated by the passage and signing of [Senate Bill] 43,” Clay said in a statement to the News-Leader. “Not all the communities have the desire or the will to do the right thing for people in their community,” Clay added. “Thus, this is why Missouri has earned the travel advisory for the whole state.” In addition to the bill, the advisory condemns the state for a number of issues dating back to the Missouri Compromise of 1819. Those include “racial and ethnic disparities in education, health, economic empowerment and criminal justice,” a “long history” of racial violence and harassment, and recent data that shows black drivers were 75 percent more likely to be pulled over by cops than...