Can Detroit Leaders be this creative; Philly starts Ibuy Black Program

Can Detroit Leaders be this creative; Philly starts Ibuy Black Program

African American leaders, business owners launch ‘iBuyBlack’ discount card by Erin Arvedlund, STAFF WRITER @erinarvedlund | EArvedlund@phillynews.com African American business owners joined with legendary musician Kenny Gamble and religious leader Dr. Alyn Waller on Tuesday to launch a discount card they hope will encourage members of Philadelphia’s black community to spend their dollars at local black-owned businesses. About 80 business owners already have signed up to participate and accept the “iBuyBlack” card, sponsored by the Philadelphia Community of Leaders. “We heard about a similar model in Detroit, so we borrowed from them,” said Michael Rashid, former president and CEO of AmeriHealth/Caritas. “Economists say the average dollar earned by blacks stays in our community for just six hours,” Rashid told a packed audience assembled on the fourth floor of City Hall. “Compare that to the white community, in which dollars circulate for 17 days. That’s wealth-building. “Strong black businesses are good for the entire community, with the potential to lower crime and create jobs,” he said. “All people should make a point of supporting black businesses.” A broad coalition of Philadelphia leaders, City Council members, and business owners got behind development of the iBuyBlack card, which costs $10 and offers discounts of up to 15 percent every time cardholders shop at local companies. “Our goal is to recruit 500 businesses and 10,000 Philadelphians to purchase the iBuyBlack discount card by the end of this year,” said Earl Harvey, sales director for iBuyBlack.org and a member of the African American Chamber of Commerce. Currently, there are about 1,500 cardholders. Proceeds from the cards will go to support the Philadelphia Community of Leaders...
Rethinking the NAACP and the legend of Washington Ellis

Rethinking the NAACP and the legend of Washington Ellis

Rethinking the NAACP and the legend of Washington Ellis By Timothy Moore {note: please click on links,otherwise you will miss a very important part of this story. They are like footnotes}   I like many African Americans have taken the NAACP for granted, thinking that it has outlived its usefulness. It has been said that it is not radical enough, they depend on corporations too much, or their “ Image  Awards” are given to many who don’t deserve them. (Kid Rock, who fly’s the confederate flag at his concerts). I would sign up for membership, and then forget to renew more times than I care to admit.                                             However, something happened in the last week to make me rethink my relationship with this August organization. Let me share this remarkable story with you. It is about my Grandfather Washington Ellis.      My recollection of his temperament is totally at odds with his life experiences that I have come to learn about.      He was about 5’4” inches in height, with very dark brown skin. I imagine his complexion was similar to how our ancestors looked when they got off the slave ships and before slaveholders, their sons and employees  started raping our grandmothers. To me, he was of the same stock as the small stature d Twa people of Africa who were the original inhabitants of of the British Isles (dwarfs, brownies and leprechauns) Asia (the Anu), and Philippines (negritos) . (http://www.africaresource.com/rasta/sesostris-the-great-the-egyptian-hercules/the-wonderful-first-civilization-of-the-ancient-twas-of-africa-by-mena7)        He always wore expensive shoes and they were always shined. Although he always had a cigarette in his mouth, I never saw him inhale. We...
7 ways to lower your Internet bill

7 ways to lower your Internet bill

7 ways to lower your Internet bill Stephen Layton, NerdWallet 4:02 p.m. ET March 12, 2017 (Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto) 9 CONNECTTWEETLINKEDIN 1 COMMENTEMAILMORE Even if you’re happy with your current Internet service, you might be paying too much for it. Here are ways to check if you’re getting good value for your money and tips for lowering your monthly Internet bill. 1. Test your speed This will help you make sure you’re getting what you were promised. Head to Speedtest.net to determine your service’s speed, which is most often measured in megabits per second (Mbps). You usually are guaranteed only “up to” the speed advertised on your plan. Test your service at different times of day. Internet infrastructure is shared among households, so you may receive more or less bandwidth than promised, depending on who else is using the network at the time, among other factors. If you’re consistently getting slower speeds, call your Internet service provider. If the issue can’t be resolved, it may be time to look for a different provider that can provide better value. The information about speed also can be helpful if you want to negotiate your bill (see No. 3). 2. Know and reduce your usage The chart below shows common Internet activities and the bandwidth they require. Keep in mind that your total bandwidth is shared by all the devices on your connection. If multiple people are online simultaneously, you’ll need enough bandwidth for everyone. What internet speed do you need? If you want … You’ll need about… General web surfing, email, social media 1 Mbps Online gaming* 1-3 Mbps Video conferencing** 1-4 Mbps Standard-definition video streaming...
If you have a cable TV set-top-box, you need to read this

If you have a cable TV set-top-box, you need to read this

I was excited to hear about Comcast’s new app that will let you watch TV without a set-top box through a Roku. But then I heard they’re still planning to charge customers a monthly fee. What gives? Thanks, Dear POed, Here’s what’s happening. The Roku app will let you watch all the Comcast channels available through your set-top box on a TV that’s not connected to a big, ugly cable box. Not only are those set-top boxes unsightly and bulky but they’re also expensive. Comcast charges a $9.95 rental fee for each additional box in your home. (The first box is included with the price of your monthly service.) The Federal Communications Commission estimates this costs customers on average more than $230 a year.  Comcast The idea of being able to connect multiple TVs, like the TV you might have in your bedroom or the one in your basement, to your cable TV service without paying an additional $10 a month per box sounds like a sweet deal, right? But not so fast. A Comcast spokesperson confirmed that the company will be charging customers an “access fee” of $7.45 for each TV using the Roku app. That’s the same price Comcast charges customers who use a TiVo or other CableCard device instead of renting a set-top box from Comcast. FCC rules require Comcast and other cable operators to give subscribers a discount if they use a Cablecard device instead of renting a set-top box, which is why the price is discounted for Comcast customers. What makes this fee striking is that it’s not designed to pay for any particular...