Why are Black girls committing suicide?

Why are Black girls committing suicide?

It is unthinkable, but happening. Little Black girls are killing themselves. The causes include disproportionate exposure to violence and traumatic stress, aggressive school discipline, and depression, according to researchers and mental health experts. Counselors and child advocates believe the disturbing trend can be reversed with love, commitment, and support services. According to a 2015 study of trends by the Journal of the American Medical Association, children’s suicide rates have significantly doubled for Black children in the last two decades, and decreased for White children. For Black youth (ages 10-19), the rate of male suicides (5.59 per 100,000) was three times higher than that of young Black females (1.87 per 100,000), according to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. “We’ve been seeing it over the last number of decades within our communities, because there was a time when it really was rare for African American youth, but unfortunately, it’s becoming more and more common,” said Dr. Thema Bryant-Davis, a clinical psychologist and associate professor at Pepperdine University. to read more of this story, click...
Charlotte’s Black leaders leverage power to benefit it’s Black citizens

Charlotte’s Black leaders leverage power to benefit it’s Black citizens

One of Republicans’ top vote suppressors gets caught saying the quiet part out loud Former GOP governor delivers racist rant against black political leaders. Ian Millhiser May 10, 2018, 1:20 pm   Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump (L) listens to North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory during a campaign rally at Wilmington International Airport November 5, 2016 in Wilmington, North Carolina. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Charlotte, North Carolina has a black mayor, a black police chief, a black fire chief, a black school board chair, a black district attorney, and it will soon have a black sheriff — and the state’s former governor is very upset about this fact. As governor, Republican Pat McCrory signed the most comprehensive voter suppression law in the nation. Indeed, this law was arguably the most aggressive attempt any state made to keep black voters away from the polls since the Jim Crow era. As a federal appeals court that struck the law down explained, state lawmakers studied racial voting patterns within the state, and then “enacted legislation restricting all — and only — practices disproportionately used by African Americans.”   Flash forward to less than two years after McCrory lost his reelection bid, and the ex-governor is now a talk radio host in Charlotte. And he’s not the least bit happy that his city will be led by black people. to read more of this story, click...
Republican to propose balancing budget with cuts to Social Security and Medicade

Republican to propose balancing budget with cuts to Social Security and Medicade

  by Erica Werner June 19 at 4:48 PM Email the author   House Republicans released a proposal Tuesday that would balance the budget in nine years — but only by making large cuts to entitlement programs, including Medicare, that President Trump vowed not to touch. The House Budget Committee is aiming to pass the blueprint this week, but that may be as far as it goes this midterm election year. It is not clear that GOP leaders will put the document on the House floor for a vote, and even if it were to pass the House, the budget would have little impact on actual spending levels. Nonetheless the budget serves as an expression of Republicans’ priorities at a time of rapidly rising deficits and debt. Although the nation’s growing indebtedness has been exacerbated by the GOP’s own policy decisions — including the new tax law, which most analyses say will add at least $1 trillion to the debt — Republicans on the Budget Committee said they felt a responsibility to put the nation on a sounder fiscal trajectory. “The time is now for our Congress to step up and confront the biggest challenge to our society,” said House Budget Chairman Steve Womack (R-Ark.). “There is not a bigger enemy on the domestic side than the debt and deficits.” to read more o this article,click...
US Soccor; Why aren’t we playing in Russia?

US Soccor; Why aren’t we playing in Russia?

‘It’s only working for the white kids’: American soccer’s diversity problem Football is the world’s great democratic game. But in the US success is often determined by the wealth of a player’s parents Les Carpenter @Lescarpenter Wed 1 Jun 2016 06.00 EDT Last modified on Mon 20 Feb 2017 06.39 EST Children play soccer in Bakersfield, California. The talents of some of America’s best young players are being suffocated by a process that never lets them be seen. Photograph: Lucy Nicholson / Reuters/Reuters As Doug Andreassen, the chairman of US Soccer’s diversity task force, looks across the game he loves, all he can see is a system broken in America. And he wonders why nobody seems to care. He sees well-to-do families spending thousands of dollars a year on soccer clubs that propel their children to the sport’s highest levels, while thousands of gifted athletes in mostly African American and Latino neighborhoods get left behind. He worries about this inequity. Soccer is the world’s great democratic game, whose best stars have come from the world’s slums, ghettos and favelas. And yet in the US the path to the top is often determined by how many zeroes a parent can write in their checkbook. Andreassen watches his federation’s national teams play, and wishes they had more diversity. Like many, he can’t ignore the fact that last year’s Women’s World Cup winners were almost all white, or that several of the non-white players on the US Copa America roster grew up overseas. The talents of some of America’s best young players are being suffocated by a process that never lets them be seen....
Rosanne Barr fired by a “Sista”

Rosanne Barr fired by a “Sista”

The woman behind ‘Roseanne’s’ cancellation: Get to know Channing Dungey By Kate Stanhope | Digital Editor | May 29, 2018 | 2:45 PM   Channing Dungey succeeded Paul Lee as president of the ABC Entertainment in February 2016. (Craig Sjodin / Associated Press) When “Roseanne” was canceled Tuesday, several hours after titular star Roseanne Barr posted a racist tweet, top TV talent such as Shonda Rhimes, Kenya Barris, Ava DuVernay and Viola Davis all singled out one name: Channing Dungey, the president of ABC Entertainment Group who announced the shocking news. ABC’s swift decision to cancel its top-rated show — and one of the most-viewed series of the entire 2017-18 season — is not the first time Dungey has made history. When she was named network president in February 2016, she became the first African American to hold the position. By Tuesday afternoon, the spotlight had suddenly shifted to Dungey, with her name trending on Twitter and gratitude pouring in from celebrities such as Kerry Washington and Marlee Matlin to read the rest of this story click...